AlvinAllistar

Timothy Corbin

Posted in Photography by AlvinAllistar on 25 februari 2013

Timothy Corbin

Landscape photographer Timothy Corbin recently captured some stunning photos of ice-laden tress on the shore of Lake Ontario. It’s amazing is to see the evidence of what must have been hours of violent waves creating layers of ice that now hover over water or ice that’s now perfectly serene. You can see a couple more shots over on his Flickr stream.

Advertenties

Indoor Clouds

Posted in Art, Photography by AlvinAllistar on 16 januari 2013

Artist Berndnaut Smilde Brings the Weather Indoors with his Temporary Nimbus Clouds clouds
Berndnaut Smilde, Nimbus Cukurkuma Hamam 2012. Photo by Onur Dag.

Artist Berndnaut Smilde Brings the Weather Indoors with his Temporary Nimbus Clouds clouds
Berndnaut Smilde, Nimbus Platform57 2012. Photo by Cassander Eeftinck Schattenkerk.

Artist Berndnaut Smilde Brings the Weather Indoors with his Temporary Nimbus Clouds clouds
Berndnaut Smilde, Nimbus Minerva 2012. Photo by Cassander Eeftinck Schattenkerk.

Artist Berndnaut Smilde Brings the Weather Indoors with his Temporary Nimbus Clouds clouds
Berndnaut Smilde, Nimbus 2010.

Artist Berndnaut Smilde Brings the Weather Indoors with his Temporary Nimbus Clouds clouds
Berndnaut Smilde, Nimbus D’Aspremont 2012. Photo by Cassander Eeftinck Schattenkerk.

Artist Berndnaut Smilde Brings the Weather Indoors with his Temporary Nimbus Clouds clouds
Berndnaut Smilde, Nimbus II 2012. Photo by Cassander Eeftinck Schattenkerk.

Moses is famously known for parting the Red Sea, and Aeolus was said to have bestowed Odysseus with a bag containing the wind, and now Netherlands-based artist Berndnaut Smilde has mastered the art of conjuring clouds as part of his Nimbus series. Smilde’s methods however are less mythic and more practical, instead relying on delicate balance of smoke, moisture and light. Of course science alone doesn’t account for the striking visual impact contained in each image, as the artist carefully selects the perfect location for the creation of each cloud and then painstakingly lights it from behind for the desired effect. Via email Smilde tells me that it can take quite a while to get all of the elements in place for each cloud and that the installation is so fleeting, the use of photography is critical in capturing the split second where everything becomes perfect.



 

Out of the box. Project Analog vs Digital

Posted in Design, Digital, Gadgets, JUNIOR* Academie, Photography, Work by AlvinAllistar on 16 januari 2013

This is a new project i was working on during the last 2 months.

Make something out of something with a message.

Ive got back from where it all started. Normally designers did everything with pencils, markers, paint etc etc. And actually the computer destroyed it all.

it’s still there, but where all used more to our computers. But don’t forget where it all started..

Laptop Art

Broken macbook

And the final picture!

Destroyed macbook

A Photographer Captures his own Shadow

Posted in Photography by AlvinAllistar on 16 januari 2013

Im Not There: A Photographer Captures his own Shadow portraits

Im Not There: A Photographer Captures his own Shadow portraits

Im Not There: A Photographer Captures his own Shadow portraits

Im Not There: A Photographer Captures his own Shadow portraits

Im Not There: A Photographer Captures his own Shadow portraits

Im Not There: A Photographer Captures his own Shadow portraits

I’m Not There is an ongoing series of portraits by photographer PoL Úbeda Hervàs who lives and works in Barcelona. He says the series came from changes in his life that left him unsure of who he is, but decided to leave the shoes as a small reminder that there was at least some fragment of his personality left behind, more than just a shadow.

The Struggle to Right Oneself: Kerry Skarbakka Photographs Himself in Suspended Peril

Posted in Photography by AlvinAllistar on 16 januari 2013

The Struggle to Right Oneself: Kerry Skarbakka Photographs Himself in Suspended Peril stunts portraits flying

The Struggle to Right Oneself: Kerry Skarbakka Photographs Himself in Suspended Peril stunts portraits flying

The Struggle to Right Oneself: Kerry Skarbakka Photographs Himself in Suspended Peril stunts portraits flying

The Struggle to Right Oneself: Kerry Skarbakka Photographs Himself in Suspended Peril stunts portraits flying

The Struggle to Right Oneself: Kerry Skarbakka Photographs Himself in Suspended Peril stunts portraits flying

The Struggle to Right Oneself: Kerry Skarbakka Photographs Himself in Suspended Peril stunts portraits flying

The Struggle to Right Oneself: Kerry Skarbakka Photographs Himself in Suspended Peril stunts portraits flying

The Struggle to Right Oneself: Kerry Skarbakka Photographs Himself in Suspended Peril stunts portraits flying

The Struggle to Right Oneself: Kerry Skarbakka Photographs Himself in Suspended Peril stunts portraits flying

In his photographic self-portrait series Struggle to Right Oneself, artist Kerry Skarbakka captures himself in moments of suspended peril: falling from trees, tumbling head over heels in painfully precarious falls, slipping nude in the shower, or teetering on the edge of a fateful leap from a railway bridge. In his artist statement Skarbakka references philosopher Martin Heidegger’s description of human existence as a process of perpetual falling, and the responsibility of each person to catch ourselves from our own uncertainty. He continues:

This photographic work is in response to this delicate state. It comprises a culmination of thought and emotion, a tying together of the threads of everything I perceive life has come to represent. It is my understanding and my perspective, which relies on the shifting human conditions of the world that we inhabit. It’s exploration resides in the sublime metaphorical space from where balance has been disrupted to the definitive point of no return. It asks the question of what it means to resist the struggle, to simply let go. Or what are the consequences of holding on?

Skarbakka says that he utilizes special climbing gear and other rigging to achieve each shot, but the final images are truly convincing if somewhat ambiguous. This too is on purpose, as the images are meant to leave the viewer questioning. Do they suggest we can fly? Do we fall? What happens when we land? See many more shots from the series over on his website. All images courtesy the artist. (via not shaking in the grass)

Winter in de buurt

Posted in Photography, Work by AlvinAllistar on 16 januari 2013

Zwanenburg winterWinter NederlandWinter boerderijwinterland

Boguslaw Strempel

Posted in Photography by AlvinAllistar on 23 november 2012

Boguslaw Strempel

In that brief window of time when the foggy remnants of night clash with the rays of early morning sun, photographer Boguslaw Strempel positions himself atop high mountain peaks to capture these beautiful landscapes around Poland and the Czech Republic. See many more photos here.

Jack boat

Posted in JUNIOR* Academie, Photography, Work by AlvinAllistar on 9 november 2012

 

Camille Seaman

Posted in Photography by AlvinAllistar on 11 oktober 2012

Camille Seaman

American photographer Camille Seaman hasn’t just got a great eye, but nerves of steel to boot. Known for her magnificent images of icebergs, Seaman decided to switch gears and try her luck at storm chasing. For her series The Big Cloud she spent her time chasing severe weather up and down the American Midwest, capturing breath-taking and awe-inspiring supercells as they sweep across the middle of the country.

“Clouds are a beautiful metaphor. They are so ethereal; they cannot be touched but you can see them,” Seaman says. “You can watch them as they form from ‘nothing’ and grow and rage and boom and sparkle. They rain or snow or blow and nourish and destroy; they create and build; they damage and flood. They move resources from one place to another.”

There is something utterly humbling about watching storm clouds churn about in the sky above. Clouds are the largest natural formation we can perceive as having dynamic movement. Like tidal waves in the sky, these massive formations crash into each other, rise to staggering heights, unleash torrents of rain, and bolts of blinding lightning. All of this violence, occurring just a few thousand feet above our heads, can be completely arresting and serenely beautiful when observed from a distance. This constantly shifting tropospheric struggle can yield such unique textures and vibrant colors that not even the most masterful painter could reproduce them.

via Aether Journal

Mark Tipple

Posted in Photography by AlvinAllistar on 1 oktober 2012

Mark Tipple

Australian photographer Mark Tipple makes surfers and snorkelers look like they’re floating through the sky in his breathtakingly beautiful “The Underwater Project.” Tipple captured these incredible shots on the Australian coast as his subjects swam through oceanic waves that look like fluffy clouds.